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Welcome to Advanced Energy, Molecular Environmental, and Nanotechnology Research Laboratory
Environmental Engineering

 

National Cheng Kung University

Distinguished Professor H. Paul Wang (王鴻博特聘教授)

Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University

(環境工程學系, 國立成功大學)

Prof. H. Paul Wang

 

 

 

In order to bring this novel concept into focus and to assess the advanced exploratory research, we have brought together scientists from a broad range of disciplines to discuss research opportunities and the methods capable of creating a new frontier especially in understanding nature of quantum size metals, bimetals or alloys and possibly applications of them. Professor Wang's research interests includes five topics: (1) Smart recycling; (2) Green energy; (3) Molecular environmental science; (4) Advanced material; and (5) Environmental Engineering.

Smart Recycling Nanosize (<100 nm) pollutants have been controlled negligibly in conventional air pollution control devices. The hidden dangers of nanopollutants from many sources such as air-borne gaseous and particulate matters from coal-fired power plants, waste incinerators and automobiles may exacerbate the environment and human health on a daily basis. The ultrafine insoluble iridium particles can migrate into the deep lung and deposit in liver, spleen, heart or brain. Nano species may also enter human cells via the blood circulation. Very fine particles may exist in the waste water, for instance, nano species (68-120 nm) have been found in the CMP (chemical mechanical planarization) waste water of the semiconductor manufacturing industries. In the recent experimental work, we found that in a very short contact time (<2 min), 80-95% of nanosize copper in CMP waste water could be incorporated into a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). More details>

Green Energy The hyper-fast and over-exploitation of fossil fuels and natural resources have changed rapidly the world energy system. Solar energy, which is abundant, clean, cheap, and regenerative, has been thought to be the new energy sources alternates. The carbon dioxide generated by extracting electricity from the solar energy is only one percent in contrast to the conventional electrical power. The plentiful, reversible, and technology available solar power has raised the increasing scientific interest and industrialized. Furthermore, from the viewpoint of providing cost-effective solar electricity, much attention and efforts have been focused and contributed on the cheap solar cells and modules. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), which are inexpensive, vacuum equipments free, sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies comparable to the traditional silicon solar cells, flexible, and scale-up viable, have been explored and studied in the near decades. More details>

Molecular Environmental Science The studies of photocatalytic degradation of environmental toxic compounds such as trichloromethane, 2-chlorophenol, and arsenic (As(III)) on nanosize TiO2 based photocatalysts has been developed. X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used in characterization of valence and local structure (<1 nm) of photoactive species in the photocatalysts. Molecular structure information such as coordination number, bond distance, and oxidation state of elements has been determined by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. More details>

Advanced MaterialsA very simple method for synthesizing nanosize-controllable (4-40 nm) metals (Cu, Ag, Pd, Rh, Ni, Fe, Co, and Cr) or alloys within carbon shells has been developed. The thickness of the carbon shells that prevents the core metals from being aggregated or oxidized ranges from 3-5 nm. In addition, the synthesized metal nanoparticles exhibit a correlation between dpZ/R (where Z: valence of metal and R: atomic radius (nm) of metal) and OH/M (metal) ratios of 2.3-15. This has significant implications in that many metal nanoparticles with selected sizes can be obtained at a known OH/M ratio. More details>

 

Lab Location

Prof. Wang's office is located on the 2nd floor at the Department of Environmental Engineering (Cheng Kung campus (成功校區), Building 27). The laboratory is located on the 5th floor (Room 47511) at the Building of Geotechnical Engineering (卓群大樓)(Cheng Kung campus, Building 28). The direction to the department can be found at the Google Map.

Contact Me

E-mail: wanghp@mail.ncku.edu.tw 
Tel: +886-6-276-3608 (Office)        
       +886-6-275-7575#65850#32 (Office)        
       +886-6-275-7575#65832 (Lab)        
Fax: +886-6-275-2790

1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan. Tel: +886-6-275-7575#65832; Fax: +886-6-275-2790

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